EdBlogs

Welcome to EdBlogs, where you'll find education insights, analysis and stories from the frontline. If you've got a story to tell, send it over to ed@edcentral.uk and if we think it's relevant to our network we'll publish it :-)

A beginner’s guide to: Doctor Martin Seligman

Best known for: The author of more than 250 scholarly publications and 20 books, Seligman started out being known for 'learned helplessness' a condition he discovered, which led humans and animals t behave helplessly in an unpleasant situation, even if they could change it. Since 2000, Seligman has become best known as the founder is perhaps best k...
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Schools thrive with order, discipline and the eccentric teachers who do things differently

"Let down your buckets!" Mr Wilkes shouts at window-shaking volume. It's 1993 or 1994 and I am in my earth science class, a subject I think would be called geography today. Mr Wilkes paces the front of the room, red-faced and miming semaphore. "The becalmed ship flagged back its reply. We need fresh water! We need to drink!" We all lean forward, th...
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A beginner’s guide to Tony Wagner

Where does he work? Tony Wagner is a Senior Research Fellow at the Learning Policy Institute, an American think-tank that researches educational policy and practices, and advocates for evidence-based policymaking in education. Before this, he held a number of positions within Harvard University, including a stint as an...
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A beginner’s guide to Doctor Gary Jones

Best known for: Jones is an advocate of evidence-based educational leadership and management. His blog, Evidence Based Educational Leadership, explores how educators can use research more in their practice, and the pedagogical implications in doing so. In 2016 he published an online handbook for teachers and school leaders on the best uses of evide...
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Focus on ... determining what research evidence to trust

Photo by Chuttersnap via Unsplash
A new guide from US-based Mathematica Policy Research's Center for Improving Research Evidence, explains to educators how to tell which type of research evidence supports claims about effectiveness, ordering them from the weakest (anecdotal) to the strongest (causal). The guide gives examples of common sources for each type of evidence, such as mar...
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